Friday, 11 March 2016

Keep your Dog in View on Walks


If you are out walking your dog and it goes out out of sight have you have really any idea it could be up to? On my Facebook page over the last few days I have seen all of the following stories:

  • A dog was shot by the farmer because it had been worrying sheep, one of which died and one of which may have to be put down. The owner insisted the dog had only been out of her sight for a few moments.  That may be true but remember,  ALL dogs are still 99% wolf and all are capable of worrying or killing farm animals.
  • A dog with no owner in sight ran up to a friend who is a bit unsteady on her feet awaiting a knee operation, causing her to almost fall.  The owner, when he finally got there, assured her that the dog was friendly but that was the problem.  He was too friendly and she could have fallen when he jumped up.
  • Being stolen - how many stories do we hear of dogs who have been stolen?  Some may be stolen from unlocked cars or insecure gardens but think about it - how long would it actually take for someone to take your dog, have them in a car and be away before you know what happens?  Hours?  Minutes?  Seconds?
  •  

Maybe you don't think your dog is capable of killing sheep.  Maybe you don't think they would ever knock anyone over.  Maybe this will make you realise that when walking your dog, you really do to keep them in view at all times:

LOST


It felt so good hurtling along the sand with the salty wind ripping through her soft ears.
She was surprised to see, when she turned back, how small all that was familiar to her had become.
Her legs were tired and when the firm hands scooped her up she was grateful not to have to gallop further.

Months later, as the last of the faded posters was ripped from the lamp post, with it, all hope for her was also lost. 
***********************

This post is linking up with my Animal Tales linky - please do head over and have a look at the other blogs joining in and if you have an animal post (old or new) please do add it.  There a BLOG ANNOUNCEMENT over there too!  


Prose for Thought

30 comments :

  1. We are almost lambing and there have been some awful cases here of whole flocks being killed by dogs. Heavily pregnant ewes are particularly vulnerable. My advice would be, if you are on farm land, don't let them off the lead at all x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. We are lucky and have no sheep on the walks I do regularly with Saari but on other walks I am much more vigilant and keep her closer to me. Too many owners have too little appreciation of the wolf in their pets with what can be horrible results for flocks of sheep.

      Delete
  2. I always panic and call out for Doc when I don't see him within my eyesight. While I'm not worried that he might kill a farm animal (I think he is a bit of whimp to do that), I'm worried that he might excitedly jump on someone, just like you mentioned. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am lucky in that Saari is scared of most people but I also know she is a big dog and could easily kill something - she often catches mice and even coypu so I know she could kill a lamb if she wanted to. All dogs are still 99% wolf.

      Delete
  3. I always went nuts when you couldn't see a dog's owner. Once my dog was attacked by two dogs in a park while the owner was nowhere to be seen. Finally I managed to grab her covered in bites as I was determined she wouldn't die that way. Personally, I had a special extra long training lead which I used to put on my dog when needed - for example when we were on holiday in the West Highlands during lambing season!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've used the long lead method too. Saari can be very stubborn at not coming back if, for example, she has the scent of a mouse down a hole but I have recently discovered that she comes back almost straight away to a high pitched dog whistle. That'll save me a lot of yelling whilst previously she just looked and me in a "yeah - when I'm ready!" tone of woof!

      Delete
  4. Living where we do, my biggest fear is that one of them would get hit by a car. They never leave our fenced yard unless they're on a leash!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have taught Saari to stop at the roads we have to cross but when we walk in new places she must stay much closer to me or on the lead.

      Delete
  5. Very wise words. I have seen a lot posted recently where dogs have attacked and killed sheep. Not the dogs fault, but the owners I would suggest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely the fault lies with the owner and an inability to believe their adorable pooch could possibly inflict injuries or worse to a farm animal. Sadly they can and they do and without proper control we will keep reading about these horrible stories.

      Delete
  6. I wish all dog owners were as responsible! So often we see dogs running far from their owners on the sea front, fighting on the beach, and there are piles of poo or, possibly even worse, poo-filled bags everywhere.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahhh - don't get me going on discarded poo bags, it is so annoying. I cannot understand people who have gone to the effort of collecting the poo to simply lob the bag on the beach or in the hedge. Grrrrrrrr.

      Delete
  7. Stella is rarely out of my sight. At the end of the day as owners, we are responsible for our dogs, that means being responsible for their actions too.

    We met a man just today trying to walk 3 dogs at once...he was holding 2 but the third, although a lead was attached to his collar was just running around loose like a mad thing...when he jumped on Stella, he called to me, "I can't hold him as well". My advice was to only walk as many dogs as you can control. What would he have done if Stella hadn't been submissive and attacked his dog?! Blamed me no doubt!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right - owners need to be responsible and too many aren't.

      Delete
  8. we keep a very close eye on Bob when we let him off leash in the desert as he's the same colour as the sand and we've met many people who have lost their dog spending hours, days and weeks hoping for their return. A few weeks a go someones dog wandered off after an Oryx that I've wild and the Oryx attacked and killed it. Very sad indeed, the Oryx was just defending itself although people who were there said the dog didn't attack or even bark at it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wildlife will go to any length to protect itself - I wonder of the Oryx had young with it?

      Delete
  9. I have spent a lot of careful hours teaching my kids not to bound up to dogs, particularly when they seem unattended, and the number of times people say 'oh he's friendly and love children' while I do so is quite irritating. I know they are really used to reassuring nervous small people, but nervous around dogs is not my chidren's problem...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is very important to teach children not to touch dogs unless the owner is there and has said it is OK.

      Delete
  10. I love the little poem/story at the end - very emotional

    ReplyDelete
  11. Very true - having 100 per cent recall is difficult in practice though. I get very nervous if my dog is far away and always call him back & reward with a treat as he is still young & I'm trying to imprint on his mind that staying close to me is best! Sometimes it makes me feel paranoid - I'd never let him off the lead on the way into our local park for example - but always get there, check for any risks, temptations etc - and then decide if it's safe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like you are being a very responsible owner. Luckily Saari comes back to a dog whistle.

      Delete
  12. That's so sad, it broke my heart as I read it,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry! If it makes one person keep their dog a little closer though then it's sadness is worth it.

      Delete
  13. I love your story, you've captured so much emotion in so few words x #prose4t

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Sara. I had a clear picture in my head of my friend's little dog running off and as she is so small and friendly it would be so easy for anyone to pick her up and steal her.

      Delete
  14. That's a beautiful poem but so sad and it does indeed who how quickly it could happen... and be forgotten about by all but the poor dog and poor owners. #prose4t

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Too many dogs are stolen each year and some could have been prevented had the dog not been allowed to wander.

      Delete
  15. What wise words Rosie - and that piece of prose at the end made me cry. It is beautiful. Thank you for linking to Prose for Thought xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank and sorry at the same time, Vicky. I hope if it keeps one dog closer and either saves it from worrying sheep or being stolen then I have achieved something in my few words.

      Delete

I love receiving comments and I do read every one but if you are simply here to spam me with a link, guess what ... I won't publish it.